Driverless cars are deciding who lives and who dies. Improve your chances.

Driverless cars are deciding who lives and who dies. Improve your chances.

A story of the near-future

Stage 1: Release of A Field Guide to the True Dangers of Autonomous Vehicles

Advertisement for A Field Guide to the True Dangers of Autonomous Vehicles

About a year after fully autonomous vehicles had been available to the general public, Alexander Manuel, an ex-Tesla and Google employee releases the book, A Field Guide to the True Dangers of Autonomous Vehicles. In it, Manuel outlines the process that he and his colleagues went through at the companies to create a moral system that the driverless cars live by. He describes how there is actually a hierarchical system in place, ranking people by age, gender, health, occupation, net worth, the number of people who you regularly interact with, as well as other factors. This system then gives every individual in the United States a score out of 1000, which the companies refer to as the AVSI (Autonomous Vehicle Safety Index). This is similar to the FICO score in that no matter whether or not the person has ever actively attempted to see or calculate his or her score, it still exists and they are being judged by that. The book becomes a New York Times #1 Bestseller in its first week and sells four million of copies in the US alone.

A Field Guide to the True Dangers of Autonomous Vehicles and a Facebook ad for it

Many contribute the book’s success to the marketing campaign, which pictures an image of the hierarchy of people, outlining where they stand in society and their likelihood of surviving in a crash involving an autonomous vehicle. It is advertised everywhere, including billboards, subway ads, and Facebook.

Public Advertisements for A Field Guide to the True Dangers of Autonomous Vehicles

Stage 2: People Begin Concealing Their Faces

Newspaper clippings of stories about the release of A Field Guide to the True Dangers of Autonomous Vehicles

The release of the book naturally caused a lot of doubt and questioning about the system, primarily concerning privacy. People don’t like that they are being judged based on who they are and they also don’t like that all the new autonomous vehicles are constantly tracking and detecting them. Some fear that it is a Big Brother situation, while others simply don’t want to be judged, based on their age, health, gender, etc. And at this point, no one really knows how to access their AVSI score or even get a general idea of it, either. Therefore, people, out of fear mainly, begin to conceal their identity with masks and hoods.

Close-ups of articles

Several experts, including Manuel himself, come out and say that people should not wear masks because anonymity reduces your chances of survival by providing the individual with a score of 400/1000, well below the national average. Some people refuse the advice, however, and their are a few casualties because of it.

Stage 3: AVSafe App is Released to the General Public

AVSafe Home Screen

In reaction to the confusion and outcry over the AVSI system, a startup AVSafe is born. They create an app that allows anyone to get a good idea of his or her score. The user just has to enter some general information, and the app comes up with an approximate score, which can be made more accurate by linking to social media, Apple HealthKit, as well as financial records. Users can see their scores and how they relate to what’s possible and work to reach that goal to better improve their chances of survival. On the other end of the spectrum, the app also has a controversial feature that allows individuals to volunteer themselves in a situation by decreasing their score to 100/1000.

The app was released with mixed reactions, as some saw it as a way to increase chances of survival, while others saw it more as a way for companies to garner more information on people.

The following is a press release from AVSafe when the app was announced:

In cities across the country, the first fully autonomous vehicles are being rolled out and used by the general public. They have been advertised as “the safest vehicles ever produced.” Statistically, this may be true, but what the companies won’t tell you is that there is a secret system that tracks and rates people, based on demographic, personal connections, health, and occupation, amongst other factors. In serious situations, this score will influence decisions on who to injure or even kill if a car crash must occur. The AVSI (Autonomous Vehicle Safety Index) was recently revealed to the public in the tell-all book, A Field Guide to the True Dangers of Autonomous Vehicles, by ex-Tesla and Google employee, Alexander Manuel, who worked on creating the system, himself. The book caused mass hysteria, as people knew they were being tracked but didn’t know how to avoid it or even accurately access their scores. Some people even resorted to trying to conceal their identities with the use of masks, which actually hurt the individual’s chances of survival even more, as anonymity makes one more likely to be a victim.

However, we at AVSafe have come up with the first accurate and simple way to access, as well as directly affect, your AVSI score, so you will always know your chances of survival.

Download our app and start your free trial today. You won’t be safe if you don’t know your score.


Driverless cars are deciding who lives and who dies. Improve your chances. was originally published in agri.culture on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

“Driverless cars are deciding who lives and who dies. Improve your chances.” Posted first on ” Design on Medium “
Author: Theodore Richards

Author: Pawan Kumar

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